Canoes for hunting & fishing Part 3

Grumman Canoes Address: Dept. SA, PO. Box 549, Marathon, NY 13803; 607/849-3211. Model: 1550C. Length: 15′. Width: 35 1/16″. Depth: 12 1/8″. Holl Design: Flat bottom with keel. Material: 0.050″ aluminum. Weight: 69 lbs. SRP:…

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Yvolution Y Velo Flippa Balance Bike

Early on, usually pre-schoolers used to ride a try cycle and after decent growth, they were given balance bike, click here to read best balance bike reviews. Later on, pedal bike was also given to allow them the ultimate freedom of riding through paddling a bike. This was a matter of changing 2 to 3 vehicles during a kid’s 2 to 6 years of age. The change of different types of bikes also associates with different expenditures which really sum up a decent amount. So it was all about spending more money for letting your child ride a bike.

But modern design and technology have evolved a lot and special thank goes to Yvolution Flippa because of developing Yvolution Y Velo Flippa Tricycle and Balance Bike. In fact, this is a pedal bike too. Now the necessity for buying 2 to 3 bikes according to children’s different ages has been lessened as this is a 2 in 1 trike and balance bike. Though it is called by 2 in 1, but if anybody calls it as 3 in 1, then there will be no issue as it can be converted from tricycle to balance bike to pedal bike.
Normally the bike comes as a tricycle which can be ridden without any risk of falling as this has 3 wheels that make a well-balanced situation. There is a remarkable process of attaching the back 2 wheels into 1 and thus converting into a balance bike. Many of you may say that it is a pedal bike instead of a balance bike as always there are pedals, but you have to look at the position of the pedals.

Yvolution Y Velo Flippa Balance Bike

Look at the picture of the convertible bike and see that the pedals are with the first wheel that means if your kids stretch their legs and place the feet on the ground, there is no chance of friction with the pedals. It is really an advantage to ride as a balance bike while in need for gaining balance. If your child needs to ride the bike as a pedal bike, then he or she has the freedom to do so as the pedals are always there to paddle. After being a balanced rider, your child will not have to go for another option to buy a pedal bike.
This is an adjustable bike that can be changed in different ways. The seat’s height can be taken up or down as per the need of the rider.

We have talked a lot about the advantages and features of the bike, now come to the look of the bike. The look in one word is awesome. The finish and aesthetic color are well enough to dazzle a child as well as an adult too.
Finally, the growing demand for having a bike for a kid has been increased in recent years. It was always a matter of changing and spending 2 to 3 times during 2 to 5 years of a kid’s early age, but as the Yvolution Y Velo Flippa has developed a revolutionary design, now it is very comfortable to satisfy your children with 1 bike.

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Old Town Canoe


Address: Dept. SA, 58 Middle St., Old Town, ME 04468; 207/827-5513. Model: Discovery 160K. Length: 16′. Width: 37″ at 4″ waterline. Depth: 15 Y2″. Hull Design: Shallow arch with chines and keel. Material: Cross Link 3 Polyetheylene. Weight: 84 lbs. SRP: $799 with center seat and rowing setup; $749 with center carry yoke.

Comments: The Discovery 160K makes a durable, stable, comfortable, reasonably maneuverable craft, especially on larger ponds and flat livers. The unusual,bull design features full-length stabilizing chines (hull projections) added to a wide beam to provide exceptional secondary stability, especially good in rough water. On flat water or under normal loads the chines ride out of the water to enhance maneuverability. However, this is not a canoe for fast-flowing water. The 160K is more than stable enough to ride comfortably with a side-mount outboard and should row like a driftboat.

Other Noteworthy Models: The Old Town Tripper 17-foot Royalex is an exceptional all-around canoe that will do anything a sportsman asks of it, easily handling moderate whitewater; paddling straight and true on the local lake, or hauling heavy loads of gear or game.

Radisson Products

Address: Dept. SA, RO. Box 130, Callander, Ontario, Canada POH 1HO; 705/752-3660. Model: 14′ pointed. length: 13’6″. Width: 38″. Depth: 13′. Hull Design: Flat bottom with sponsors, full-length keel. Material: 5052 marine aluminum. Weight: 41 lbs. SRP: $600 U.S. with paddles and motor mount).

Comments: The Radisson offers the maintenance-free durability of an aluminum craft, yet solves the problems of noise and cold with a closed-cell foam liner. Foam sponsors add secondary stability to the high initial stability of the flat-bottom design. Full keel helps straight-line tracking, while the basic short/wide design makes maneuvering easy.

Other Noteworthy Models: The 16-foot pointed has 3 keels, paddles more easily and carries more gear, with all the features of the 14.

We*no*nah Canoe

Address: Dept. SA, PO. Box 247, Winona, MN 55987; 507/454-5430. Model: Spirit II. Length: 17′. Width: 34 3/4″ at waterline. Depth: 14″. Hull Design: Shallow arch. Material: Fiberglass Kevlar over structural foam. Weight: 43 to 66 lbs., depending on materials and construction. SRP: $895 (fiberglass) to $1750 (ultra-light Kevlar).

Comments: Built primarily for touring, the Spirit has the makings of a great all-around canoe for sportsmen. Wide enough for good stability; long enough to paddle efficiently; fast, quiet and tough, the Spirit is at home on flat rivers, lakes and ponds, and will handle a rocky, fast section of river with ease.

Other Noteworthy Models: The short, wide Fisherman is. a very stable and maneuverable canoe, but has neither the capacity nor the paddling ease of the Spirit.

RELATED ARTICLE: Guide To Hull Shape

The shape of the hull is just as important as length and width in determining how stable a canoe is, how fast it will turn, and how easy it is to paddle. The best all-around canoes are double-ended rather than square-stern, because it’s easier to sidemount a small motor on a double-ended canoe than it is to paddle a square-stern. To paddle an unloaded canoe solo, it’s often best to sit in the bow scat and paddle backward, which isn’t possible in a square-stern.

When you look at bull design, you are also looking at the shape of the keel line–called rocker–and the lateral cross section at the canoe’s widest point.

Rocker. The curve or straightness of the keel line determines how quickly a canoe mill turn. A boat math no rocker (a straight keel line) is hard to turn quickly. Conversely, extreme rocker makes a boat ultra maneuverable, great for running rocky rivers, and impossible to keep tracking straight as you paddle across a pond in a breeze. Slight to moderate rocker is a compromise.

Cross section, The shape of a canoe bottom will affect how it tracks and how stable it is. There are two types of stability: initial stability is how much the canoe resists starting to tip; secondary stability is how much it resists tipping all the way over after it has begun to tip.

Four basic hull shapes dominate canoe design: A flat bottom has high initial stability and, especially in rough water, low secondary stability. In other words, it feels stable on a pond, but is more likely to tip over in waves. Add a keel (a raised strip) to a flat-bottom canoe and it will track extremely well on flat water, but be harder to turn. A Pound bottom has the least initial stability, good secondary stability, and is most common in highly specialized canoes.

Shallow-V and Shallow-arch hulls are modifications that produce acceptable initial stability and great secondary stability, especially in rough water. The shallow-V hull functions like a keel to keep the canoe tracking straight yet can be rolled slightly on its side for faster turning.

The sides of the canoe can flare outward, which helps keep water out but makes effective paddling more difficult. They can also turn inward, called tumblehome, which makes paddling easier. Straight sides are a compromise. Some canoes have flared sides in the middle, straight sides or tumblehome where the paddlers sit.

The final component of cross section is depth. A deeper canoe carries more, and keeps out water better, but those high sides add weight and act as a sail in wind.

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Canoes for hunting & fishing part 2

Bear Creek Canoes

bear creek canoe

Address: Dept. SA, RRI, Box 163B, Limerick, ME 04048; 207/793-2005. Model: The Wide One. Length: 14′. Width: 42″. Depth: 13″. Hull Design: Shallow V with small keel. Material: Hand-laid fiberglass cloth. Weight: 65 lbs. Suggested Retail Price: $630.

Comments: Featuring a wide, stable casting or shooting platform, this canoe’s small keel helps it track straighter. A slight rocker aids maneuverability. Not a canoe for long-distance paddling.

Other Noteworthy Models: The V-hull Mirage has more length and less beam for easier paddling, yet still has plenty of stability for hunting and fishing.


Coleman canoe

Address: Dept. SA, 3600 N. Hydraulic, Wichita, KS 67219; 316/261-3’276, Model: 5955-723. Length: i5,’. Width: 36″. Depth: 14″. Hull Design: Shallow arch with keel. Material: Polyethylene. Weight: 78 lbs. SRP: 349,

Comments: One of the most popular canoes of all time, the Coleman 15 is versatile, tough and inexpensive. With new molded spats and a new handle design, TIN Coleman is now more comfortable and easier to assemble. The flexibility of the Ram-X polyethylene huh is a plus if you hit. a rock, but detracts from paddling performance–a lot of energy is wasted in flexing the hull rather than propelling the canoe forward. Still, the Coleman 15 is a heavy, solid, basic canoe, and the price is right.

Other Noteworthy Models: while the 17-foot Coleman will carry more people and gear, the 16-foot Gold Medalist is a better performer on moving water.

Dagger Canoe

dagger canoe

Address: Dept. SA, RO. Box 1500, Harriman, TN 37748; 423/882-0404. Model: Legend. Length: 16′. Width: 33 1/2″ at 4″ waterline. Depth: 14 1/2″. Hull Design: shallow arch. Material: ABS Royalex. Weight: 70 to 76 lbs. SRP: $1295 with wood trim; $1085 math vinyl thin.

Comments: Spacious for a 16-footer, the Legend is stable, fast and maneuverable, well suited for fishing, hunting, and paddling on rivers, ponds and lakes. The durable Royalex hull is quiet and comfortable even on waves and moving water. A nice all-around canoe for sportsmen and their families.

Other Noteworthy Models: The Venture 17 is a big, rugged, uncompromising canoe for serious wilderness tripping.

Great Canadian

Address: Dept. SA, 64 Worcester Providence Tpke., Rte. 146, Sutton, MA 01590; 508/865-0010. Model: LeVoyageur. Length: 14′. Width: 37 1/2″. Depth: 12 3/4″. Hull Design: shallow arch with keel. Material: wood/fiberglass. Weight: 49 lbs. SHP: 1349.

Comments: A good-looking, functional canoe with more than enough room for two sportsmen and all of their gear. Good all-around performance on lakes, ponds and rivers; tracks well with moderate keel.

Other Noteworthy Models: The Adirondack Sportsman (14 feet) and Great Canadian (15 feet and 16 feet 2 inches) are solid-performing, reasonably priced, all-around fiberglass craft.

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Canoes for hunting & fishing part 1

An in-depth guide to the varieties of canoes and the usages and advantages of their respective designs is presented. Canoes are designed and built with a specific purpose in mind, and these factors should be considered before purchase. An analysis of 11 different canoe designs is included.

A CANOE IS a ticket to a better world. Inexpensive to buy, use and maintain, and easy to transport and store, this craft will quietly take you and your gear to unspoiled scenery, uneducated fish and undisturbed game.

Which model is right for your specific needs? Much depends on design. You can now buy hulls made specifically for whitewater; for speed on lakes and ponds; or to be motor powered.

But be careful. There are drawbacks to specialization. A friend once called me, all excited: He’d found a 10-foot solo canoe that weighed only 22 pounds. It was going to get him to brook trout in backcountry beaver ponds. A few weeks later, I asked him about it. “Sold it!” he replied. “The thing was so tippy it rolled over if you had your hair parted on the side.”

Fortunately, manufacturers still make all-around canoes that will ease you down a river to bass and trout in spring; float the family on a lake all summer; sneak you and a buddy to hidden mallards; and haul your deer back to your car in fall. That’s a sportsman’s canoe!

canoe fishing

Design Details

A canoe’s length, width and hull shape affect how easily it paddles and maneuvers, how much it can carry, and how stable it is; in other words, how it performs for fishing and hunting.

Length And Width

The rules for length are simple: A shorter canoe is generally lighter and carries and maneuvers more easily; a longer canoe paddles faster in a straight line and can hold more people and gear. Length being equal, a wider canoe is more stable and carries more, but is harder to paddle.

The best sportsman’s canoes are generally between 13 and 17 feet long, with a width measurement, at the four-inch waterline, of between 33 and 39 inches. Those parameters give you literally dozens of canoes from which to choose.


Paddles come in two styles, straight shaft and bent shaft, and in a variety of materials, including solid wood, laminated wood, metal and plastic. While the bent shaft is more efficient, the straight shaft is more versatile. Metals and plastics are virtually trouble-free, but the laminated wood paddles are nicer to look at and use.

Anchors are a necessity. An eight-pound mushroom anchor works well with most canoes. When anchoring in wind or current, have the anchor rope pull straight off the point of the bow or stern; otherwise, the current will hit the side of the canoe. Mad River makes a clamp-on anchor outrigger that controls the anchor rope, and locks it for one-hand operation.

Portage yokes, which let you carry a canoe comfortably on your shoulders; should be standard equipment. Most manufacturers offer several options, padded yokes being most comfortable.

Motor mounts for electric or small gas motors make canoes more versatile. Most manufacturers offer models that work with their canoes. Old Town and Mad River offer clamp-on mounts that fit most canoes.

Car carrying systems let you cart your canoe down the highway. Foam blocks are inexpensive; most manufacturers offer them.

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Canoe Rule part 2

Off the wind, kite-flying skiffs gain the overall-speed advantage, but by no means are International Canoes slow when the sheets are eased. When a puff hits, the slippery beam-to-length ratio and sharp water release aft result in nearly instantaneous acceleration. The apparent wind spins forward, requiring quick action on the seat, sheets, and helm. Boathandling in gusty conditions while perched out on the thwart is a lesson in anticipation – kind of like being on a seesaw with a friend who’s prone to jumping off.

The Canoe’s sloop-rigged sail plan has matured into an 80-percent-main/20-percent-jib relationship made from tried-and-true Dacron to cutting edge Mylar laminates by a variety of sailmakers. With most of the power in the main, being able to easily control that power is a Canoe sailor’s goal. At his company, Composite Engineering, techno-guru and avid Canoe racer Ted Van Dusen builds the stiff-bottom, flexible-top carbon-composite masts that dominate the class.

In high winds, the top section acts as a release valve for the high-aspect, large-roach mainsail. When a puff hits, it bends to leeward, automatically depowering the sail plan by opening the mainsail leech without the mainsheet being eased. Not having to tweak the mainsheet with every puff is a huge control advantage. Another Canoe standard that first appeared on windsurfers and catamarans are the lightweight, carbon, full-length tubular battens used in the main.

Knowledge gleaned from the Open 60 class has many Canoe sailors using booms attached to the deck just aft of the mast. This configuration transfers outhaul and boomvang loads from the gooseneck and mast to a stronger fitting on the deck. Without the extra reinforcement needed for the gooseneck, the mast has a more uniform bend from deck level up.


Bill Beaver, editor of the class newsletter and a top-level racer, puts his background in fluid dynamics to the test when designing and building his carbon-fiber Canoes. He thrives on experimenting with blade design and carbon-sandwich structures, but like many other class members, he keeps older, inexpensive boats alive in order to attract new sailors. Starter boats range from $1,000 to $3,500, while a composite boat ready for the worlds can require a $15,000 investment, or $6,000 in parts and materials and the time to build it yourself.

The 10-square-meter International Canoe can trace its heritage to the early years of recreational boating. It continues to attract top-level sailors and forward-thinking designers to regattas that are part science fair, part gymnastics meet. Although some class members feel that recent evolution has moved at a glacial pace, the boat will continue to develop. In fact, Canoe sailors in England report that asymmetric spinnakers are a gas.

Ralph Naranjo feeds his speed cravings on a windsurfer, but is fascinated by all fast craft.

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Canoes rule part 1

The 10-sqm International Canoe has rapidly evolved since its inception in the 1870s. Modern International Canoes are narrower, faster and more stable and durable. Even the skills in sailing an International Canoe have significantly improve, with top sailors displaying gymnastic-like abilities.
The 10-square-meter International Canoe is one of the fastest, oldest, and most esoteric dinghy classes in the world. The boat’s hard-core following will take every chance they get to convince you it’s the fastest singlehander, claiming 10-knot upwind speeds and 20-knot blasts off the wind. Regardless of high-speed claims, International Canoes tap every bit of their drivers’ sailing skill and boathandling savvy: master it and you’re flying; muff it and you’re swimming.


From its inception in the 1870s when canoe clubs around the world began trading paddles for masts, the sailing canoe has been off the bandwagon of conventional dinghies. The sliding thwart introduced in the mid-1880s and the “loose constructionist” approach to class rules – if it’s not prohibited, it’s OK – sent the canoe into its own orbit of technology and innovation.

When Uffa Fox put a sloop rig in his sailing canoe in 1938, the modern era of canoe racing began and during the next 30 years the canoes became progressively narrower, lighter, less stable, and more overpowered. Then in 1970, after a century of open development canoe racers looked for a balance between stability, durability, and speed and decided on the successful Peter Nethercott-designed hull, a 138-pound minimum hull weight, and 10 square meters of sail, creating the 10-square-meter International Canoe.

Despite the International Canoe’s design constraints, the naval architects, engineers, and other refugees from high school physics clubs who dominate the class have plenty of latitude to modify their rides. Various hull construction materials, from aircraft-grade plywood to aerospace composites are successfully employed, and mast, boom, sail, and blade development is never-ending.

But for those who call the sliding thwart home, the reward for in-the-garage tinkering is on-the-water results and it takes a damn good dinghy sailor to achieve them. This necessity for excellence, in both systems design and sailing ability, to be successful in the Canoe class makes it king of the development-class world. In the minds of its disciples, the Canoe rules.

In truth, calling these boats Canoes is like calling Ferraris “ground transportation.” In light air, Canoes sail in the displacement lane with everyone else. But when the breeze hits 10 to 12 knots, these high-powered, low-drag, 17-footers plane upwind, leaving 505s languishing in their wakes. As the wind builds, the unique sliding thwart comes into its own. A sailor on a trapeze would have to be 10 feet tall to replicate the righting moment of a full-seat hike, which puts the sailor up to 5 feet out over the water.

Beyond straight-line speed, the narrow waterline beam, efficient foils, and high-aspect-ratio sails make the Canoe a high pointer among dinghies with similar speed, tacking through 90 degrees on average. “If you’re sailing a canoe, there isn’t a whole lot out there that’ll beat you to the weather mark” says aficionado and past world champion Steve Clark.


LOA                                          17[feet]
LWL                                         17[feet]
Beam                                         3[feet]4[inches]
(8 [feet] with thwart)
Disp. (rigged)                         190 lbs.

Draft                                         4[inches]/3[feet]5[inches]
(daggerboard) up/dn
SA (main & jib)                      108 sq. ft.

International Canoe Class Assn.
1209 Van Buren Circle
Annapolis, MD 21403
(410) 280-3318